Kindness

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What does it mean to be kind when the world feels anything but kind?  When our own inner critic joins forces with the world to add insult to injury. When one blow after another lands us on the ground and there is seemingly no one there to help us up.  What then?

I’m no stranger to self-criticism; we’ve been long, long-time friends… and this week has presented ample opportunity for it to take the wheel and steer my life in a direction I don’t really want to go, towards a future not worthy of the gift of life I’ve been given. And so this morning, as I struggle to give voice to the difficulty of accepting my own humanity in all of its brokenness and beauty, I turn to those who have chosen the worthy path of kindness.

Kindness by Naomi Shihab Nye

Before you know what kindness really is
you must lose things,
feel the future dissolve in a moment
like salt in a weakened broth.
What you held in your hand,
what you counted and carefully saved,
all this must go so you know
how desolate the landscape can be
between the regions of kindness.
How you ride and ride
thinking the bus will never stop,
the passengers eating maize and chicken
will stare out the window forever.

Before you learn the tender gravity of kindness,
you must travel where the Indian in a white poncho
lies dead by the side of the road.
You must see how this could be you,
how he too was someone
who journeyed through the night with plans
and the simple breath that kept him alive.

Before you know kindness as the deepest thing inside,
you must know sorrow as the other deepest thing.
You must wake up with sorrow.
You must speak to it till your voice
catches the thread of all sorrows
and you see the size of the cloth.

Then it is only kindness that makes sense anymore,
only kindness that ties your shoes
and sends you out into the day to mail letters and purchase bread,
only kindness that raises its head
from the crowd of the world to say
It is I you have been looking for,
and then goes with you everywhere
like a shadow or a friend.

 

Everything is Waiting for You by David Whyte

Your great mistake is to act the drama
as if you were alone. As if life
were a progressive and cunning crime
with no witness to the tiny hidden
transgressions. To feel abandoned is to deny
the intimacy of your surroundings. Surely,
even you, at times, have felt the grand array;
the swelling presence, and the chorus, crowding
out your solo voice You must note
the way the soap dish enables you,
or the window latch grants you freedom.
Alertness is the hidden discipline of familiarity.
The stairs are your mentor of things
to come, the doors have always been there
to frighten you and invite you,
and the tiny speaker in the phone
is your dream-ladder to divinity.

Put down the weight of your aloneness and ease into
the conversation. The kettle is singing
even as it pours you a drink, the cooking pots
have left their arrogant aloofness and
seen the good in you at last. All the birds
and creatures of the world are unutterably
themselves. Everything is waiting for you.

2 thoughts on “Kindness

  1. Oh Mollie, I am no stranger to self-criticism and the hold it can have over you as well. Here is something I read in my devotional, The Way of Abundance by Ann Voskamp, this morning. “Hand over your whole self. Your whole broken self. Givenness. Because this is far easier than pretending to be whole and not broken.” Thanks for doing this here!

    Like

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